WA Media Awards


Entries close at midnight on Friday August 18


The WA Media Awards are open to all journalists and media professionals across all forms of print and electronic media throughout Western Australia.

Those who enter do not have to be members of the Media, Entertainment & Arts Alliance, but the awards fee is waived for MEAA members as one of the benefits of their membership. The entrants must be Western Australian residents or working for a Western Australian-based organisation.

Entries close at midnight on Friday, August 18.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ENTER HERE

 

To be eligible for entry in this year’s awards, your work must have been published or broadcast between July 1, 2016 and June 30, 2017.

The awards will be presented at the WA Media Ball on Saturday, October 28, at the Perth Empire Function Centre.

For more information: Anna Magnus 0423 363 725

The WA Media Awards recognise excellence, independence, innovation and originality in storytelling and distinctive reporting.

This can be through research and investigations, well-crafted and innovative presentations, news-breaking single stories or features and engaging, entertaining and/or informative reporting.

General criteria for consideration in assessing entries include:

  •     Storytelling ability
  •     Originality
  •     Public benefit and audience engagement
  •     Accuracy and ethics
  •     Impact
  •     Writing and creative flair
  •     Courage
  •     Innovation

When comparing the work of an individual with that of a group, investigative team or organisation, judges consider the resources and time available in creating the work. That includes the pressure and demand of reporting deadlines and the location of the journalist, taking into consideration potential isolation or exposure to outside forces, danger or pressure in presenting a story.

All WA Media Awards entries will be judged by their adherence to the MEAA Journalist Code of Ethics as well as to individual category descriptions.  The judges will seek clarification, where deemed necessary, of the methods used to obtain or produce the material used in entries.

  • Print/text journalism recognises journalism delivered primarily through the written word across print or digital media. It replaces the traditional print section.

    News Coverage

    This category recognises excellence in news journalism created for text formats. It recognises the diverse skills of the news reporter/journalist – not just for breaking news but for all the other elements that make a great story under the pressure of deadlines – tenacity, writing ability, accuracy, ethics, research, impact and great storytelling. The emphasis of this award is on solid, gripping reporting and outstanding individual (or small team) efforts in covering a news story.

    Entrants may enter a single report or a series on the same issue or topic comprising up to three (3) reports as a single entry.

    Feature Writing – The Hugh Schmitt Prize

    The focus of this award remains on quality writing. It celebrates excellence in the craft of feature writing and storytelling, with prime consideration given to the written word and research ability as well as originality, creativity, impact and technique. (This award is also open to multi-media packages where writing is the primary medium.) This award honours the memory of feature writer Hugh Schmitt.

    Entries in this category may be a single feature story or no more than three (3) related feature stories on the same subject.

    Headline Journalism (10 words or less)

    A broadening of the traditional print three headings category, this award recognises the art of witty and succinct journalism that grabs attention across all media. It is open to all journalists, sub-editors and digital content producers whose job it is to attract readers and viewers with clever use of language. Entrants will be judged on three samples of their work.

    Suburban – Three News Stories/Features within a 70km radius of Perth

    Awarded for the best three news stories and/or features published in suburban newspapers within a 70km radius of Perth CBD.

    Entrants to submit up to three (3) pieces, not necessarily related, to be judged as indicative of their work.

  • This platform recognises visual journalists producing still photography for any platform. Criteria include storytelling, courage, public impact, creativity, innovative use of technology, technical ability and resourcefulness.

    Community/Regional Photography

    Celebrating the best work of photographers working in regional and community media.

    Entrants to submit up to three (3) unrelated images to be judged as indicative of their work.

    News Photograph

    Newsworthiness, impact, technical superiority, creativity and originality will be looked at in this category. News photography encompasses a range of news photography from an exclusive or spontaneous news moment or images depicting news values on the day. The images should represent a story or event not a series or a theme.

    Entries in this category may be a single image or no more than three (3) related images on the same subject.

    Feature Photograph/Photographic Essay

    Recognises excellence in a series of creative, original and revelatory images about a topical issue on any aspect of life.

    Awarded for best feature photograph or series (5 or less) on the same subject – at least one photograph of the series must have been published.

  • This platform recognises journalism primarily produced in audio-visual formats. It replaces the traditional television section.

    News Story or Feature

    Awarded for excellence in newsworthiness, impact and incisiveness, recognising research, production skill and public benefit in a news story or feature.

    Entrants may enter a single report or a series on the same issue or topic comprising up to three (3) reports as a single entry.

  • This platform recognises journalism produced primarily in an audio format, for radio or digital platforms. It replaces the traditional radio section.

    News Story or Feature

    Awarded for excellence in newsworthiness, impact and incisiveness, recognising research, production skill and public benefit in a news story or feature.

    Entrants may enter a single report or a series on the same issue or topic comprising up to three (3) reports as a single entry.

  • This category was created to showcase, benchmark and promote the professionalism of online reporting. It recognises newsworthy, original, and ethical journalism in the online field. Judges will also consider innovative techniques in news gathering and presentation.

    Entrants may enter a single report or a series on the same issue or topic comprising up to three (3) reports as a single entry.

  • Freelance Journalist

    This award recognises the unique and growing contribution that freelance journalists make to the industry.

    The entry must show editorial independence; newsworthiness; research; writing; production; incisiveness; impact; public benefit; ethics; originality; innovation; and creative flair.

    Entrants to submit up to five (5) pieces, not necessarily related, to be judged as indicative of their work.

    Camerawork

    This award recognises excellence in camerawork in Australian news, current affairs and documentary as well as videography and photo films in digital formats, representing the highest standards of the craft.

    Entrants to submit a single piece of footage or three (3) pieces of work showcasing a body of work.

    Political Report – The Beck Prize

    Awarded for the best political reporting in any medium, recognising excellence in newsworthiness, impact and insight. This award honours the memory of Will Beck, a long-time Hansard reporter at the WA Parliament and a prominent member of the Australian Journalists’ Association.

    Entrants may enter a single report or a series on the same issue or topic comprising up to three (3) reports as a single entry.

    Health/Medical Report

    Awarded for the best health and medical story in any medium, recognising accuracy, newsworthiness, insight, impact and public benefit.

    Entrants may enter a single report or a series on the same issue or topic comprising up to three (3) reports as a single entry.

    Science and Environmental Report

    Awarded for excellence in covering science and environmental issues, recognising accuracy, newsworthiness, insight, impact and public benefit.

    Entrants may enter a single report or a series on the same issue or topic comprising up to three (3) reports as a single entry.

    Business, Economics or Finance Report

    This award recognises excellence in business, economics and finance journalism. Judges will give special regard to newsworthiness, public benefit, storytelling, impact, incisiveness and research.

    Entrants may enter a single report or a series on the same issue or topic comprising up to three (3) reports as a single entry.

    Sports Report – The Gilmour-Christian Prize

    This award recognises the diverse skills of the sports journalist and the elements that make a great sports story – tenacity, accuracy, ethics, research, great storytelling and the capacity to capture and share the emotion in sport. This award honours the memory of Doug Gilmour, former sports editor, and Geoff Christian, sportswriter and broadcaster.

    Entrants may enter a single report or a series on the same issue or topic comprising up to three (3) reports as a single entry.

    Social Equity Report

    This award recognises the vital role of public service journalism and media reporting which addresses issues relating to social and economic equality, human rights and participatory democracy.

    Entrants may enter a single report or a series on the same issue or topic comprising up to three (3) reports as a single entry.

    Regional & Community –Three News Stories/Features outside a 70km radius of Perth

    Awarded for the best three news stories and/or features in regional or community media outside a 70km radius of Perth CBD. This category includes broadcast, online and country publications but NOT specialist rural publications such as the Countryman or Farm Weekly.

    Entrants to submit up to three (3) pieces, not necessarily related, to be judged as indicative of their work.

    New Journalist or Cadet – The Eaves-Prior-Day Prize

    Open to cadets and journalists in their first full-time year of grading. This prize honours the memory of AJA members Jack Eaves, Selwyn Prior and Merv Day, who took a great interest in the training and development of young journalists.

    Entrants to submit their three (3) best pieces of work, showing a range of skills and styles.

    Culture and Arts Report – The A.H. Kornweibel Arts Prize

    Awarded for the best culture and arts story in any medium – from newsworthy issues and individuals to topical trends, highlighting creative flair in the use of the chosen medium. The award honours the memory of Albert H. Kornweibel, who was widely celebrated for his music critiques, under the pen name Fidelio, and his reviews of books and drama.

    Entrants may enter a single report or a series on the same issue or topic comprising up to three (3) reports as a single entry.

    Columnist – The Matt Price Prize

    This category is open to journalists involved in comment and analysis and includes leader writers, reviewers, opinion columnists and bloggers across the spectrum of discussion and debate, including arts, sports, business and politics. This award honours the memory of Matt Price, former columnist for The Australian.

    Entrants to submit up to three (3) pieces, not necessarily related, to be judged as indicative of their work.

    Outstanding Journalism Student Award

    Open to all full-time undergraduate and postgraduate journalism students enrolled at a West Australian tertiary institution and not employed as journalists.

    Entrants need to submit three (3) examples of their best work, showing a range of skills and styles.

  • West Australian Journalist of the Year – The Daily News Centenary Prize

    Awarded each year for the piece of journalism judged to be the best from the winners of all the categories.

     Outstanding Contribution to Journalism -The Clarion Award

    This award is presented to a member who has, in the opinion of the Media Alliance’s Media Section committee, made the greatest contribution to the profession in WA during the year. The committee considers the quality of work and other ways in which the member has contributed to journalism and the Alliance. The award is named after the union’s 1980 national strike newspaper.

    Arthur Lovekin Prize

    The Arthur Lovekin Prize for Excellence in Journalism, which is administered and judged by the University of Western Australia, is awarded for the best contribution of the year in a newspaper or periodical produced, published or circulated in Western Australia in the previous year.

    Please note. The Arthur Lovekin Prize entry closes on July 28, so do not delay in entering this award category.

    To enter this category and download an entry form please visit www.arts.uwa.edu.au/students/awards/arthur-lovekin-prize/.

Entries close at midnight on Friday, August 18, 2017

  1. ALL ENTRIES THAT REQUIRE TO BE SENT IN ON CD OR USB, MUST BE RECEIVED IN THE QUEENSLAND ADDRESS BELOW BY C.O.B ON TUESDAY, August 15, 2017.

2017 WA Media Awards
Locked Bag 526
Spring Hill QLD 4004

  1. ENTRY FEE: Waived (MEAA members), $150 per entry (non-members)
  1. Eligible entry submissions are between July 1, 2016 – June 30, 2017.
  1. Journalists entering more than one category must complete a separate entry for each category.
  1. Group entries: in some categories, it may be appropriate to lodge a group entry. Where any of the group is not an Alliance member, the entry fee will apply for that entrant. The entry fee for non-members is applied per entry, NOT per entrant.
  1. Team entries may include any number of people with the name of the team clearly stated. One person will be the primary contact for this entry, but all names, positions and membership details should be submitted on a separate piece of paper attached to the numbered entry form when submitted with the entry. The exception is for entries to the “coverage of a news event or issue” category where entries can be made by a news organisation.
  1. Photographic entrants must certify that entry/ies may be exhibited in any display organised by WA Media Awards. Copyright holders will be acknowledged.
  1. Entry into the 2017 WA Media Awards is open to ALL journalists and photographers/camerapersons based in WA, or working for a WA-based media organisation.
  1. All entrants are required to establish their bona fides and that they have adhered to the Media, Entertainment and Arts Alliance Journalist Code of Ethics in the preparation of their entries.
  1. Each entry must be verified by a representative of the employer or commissioning publication.
  1. All entries must include a statement of up to 200 words outlining the case for consideration of an award.
  1. Please keep copies of all material submitted.
  1. Entries will not be returned.
  1. Print/text entrants are required to provide an electronic version of their material or upload directly via the entry process.
  1. Judges have the right to reject an entry that in their opinion does not comply with the requirements of the competition.
  1. The judges’ decision will be final.
  1. The New Journalist or Cadet Award is open to cadets and Journalists in their first full year of grading. Entrants are to submit their best three pieces of work showing their range of skill and style.
  1. The Clarion Prize is presented to a member who has, in the opinion of the MEAA Media Section Committee, made the greatest contribution to the profession in WA during the year. The committee considers the quality of work and other ways in which the member has contributed to journalism and MEAA.
  1. The Daily News Centenary Prize will be selected from the winners of the other awards categories.

What date do entries close?

Entries will close at midnight on Friday, August 18, 2017.

Who can enter the WA Media Awards?

Entry is open to all journalists and media professionals across all forms of print and electronic media throughout Western Australia.

Those who enter do not have to be members of the Media, Entertainment & Arts Alliance (MEAA). The Awards entry administration fee, however, is waived for MEAA members as one of the benefits of their membership. The entrants must be Western Australian residents or working for a Western Australia-based organisation.

How can I enter the 2017 WA Media Awards?

You must register by completing the electronic registration form on the entry page on this website. The form contains details of where and how to submit the physical entry. Online registration of entries via the website may be permitted (See conditions of entry) the entry registration site will close at midnight on Monday, August 14, 2017. Postal entries must be received by last post on Tuesday, August 15, 2017.

Send all entries to:

2017 WA Media Awards
Locked Bag 526
Spring Hill Qld, 4004

 What are the conditions of entry?

***NOTE: Due to the Federal Election, we have extended the broadcast/publication dates. Eligible entry submissions are now between July 01, 2016 – June 30, 2017.

What does it cost to enter the awards?

Entry fee is waived for MEAA members. A $150 fee per entry for non-members applies.

Where a non-member is part of a group entry, the normal $150 entry fee is required. Call 1300 65 65 13 to discuss membership options.

Do I have to include an entry statement of up to 200 words?

Yes, your entry statement is to assist the judging process and should outline the case for consideration for an award. You may address the judging criteria and explain the circumstances in which the entry was produced. You may write less than 200 words, but no more. The online entry form submission process will not accept more than 200 words so please write them in a word processor document first and do a word count before dropping it into the entry form.

Do I need to have the entry form authorised?

Yes, it is compulsory that you have it verified by your employer or employer representative to validate the work. This process is done online. Once you enter their details into the system it will generate an email to them asking them to verify the details you have submitted. Their verification entry email will come directly to us and a copy will also be sent back to you. An entry will not be considered until all steps have been completed.

Can I enter into a category more than once?

Each entrant may enter only once in each category. The exception is with joint or team entries. In this instance you may submit up to two entries per category. That is: one single entry and one joint or team entry, or two joint or team entries.

What is a group entry?

A group entry may include up to five people as entrants.

What is a team entry?

Team entries comprise more than five individuals who will be recognised only as a collective.

A team entry is an entry produced by more than five individuals and should be attributed to the print publication or section, network or program. It should be listed this way under “entrant’s name” in the entry form.

What are the criteria for judging?

Award winners will be chosen on the basis of journalistic excellence. This will vary according to individual categories but, in general, criteria will include:

  • Newsworthiness
  • Research
  • Writing
  • Production
  • Incisiveness
  • Impact
  • Public benefit
  • Ethics
  • Originality
  • Innovation
  • Creative flair

Judges will take regard of the resources available and effort expended in the preparation of the work.

Will entries be returned?

No. Entries will NOT be returned. Please keep copies of all material submitted.

When will the winners be announced?

The winners of the 2017 WA Media Awards will be announced at the 2017 WA Media Ball at The Empire Function Centre Northbridge on the evening of Saturday, October 28, 2017. For tickets call 1300 656 513

What do winners of the WA Media Awards categories receive?

The winner of each category in 2017 will receive a handcrafted glass trophy from West Australian award-winning designer Holly Grace. The winner of the Daily News Centenary Journalist of the Year award will also receive a prize of $1000.

 Where can I find further information?

For information on all matters related to the WA Media Awards, please contact National Manager:

State Media Awards Anna Magnus on 0423 363 725, or anna.magnus@meaa.org

The full awards winners from 2016.

Outstanding Journalism Student Award

Sponsored by the Media Entertainment and Arts Alliance

Winner:
• Thomas de Souza, Stories from the Scenic Route, University of Notre Dame

Finalists:
• Stephanie Garnaut, Body of Work, Edith Cowan University
• Cameron McAloon, Body of Work, Edith Cowan University

Judges’ comments:
“Notre Dame student Thomas de Souza’s ability to source original stories with national and international implications sets him apart as one of West Australia’s most promising young journalists.
de Souza showed maturity in his perspective and storytelling beyond that associated with student reporting, particularly his profile of a subculture choosing to live in their vehicles and his written exploration of the reliance upon drugs at Indonesia’s Gili Trawangan. These stories were picked up and published by prominent interstate newspapers in a nod to the originality of his work. Judges agreed de Souza displays a passion for his story topic and delves beyond surface judgments to understand issues affecting people from all walks of life.”

Links to view winning submission (one, two and three).

Best New Journalist or Cadet

Sponsored by Community Newspaper Group

Winner:
• Nathan Hondros, Body of Work, Mandurah Mail

Finalists:
• Claire Dearle, Body Of Work , Ten Eyewitness News
• Jacob Nazroo, Body of Work, POST Newspapers

Judges’ comments:
“This category had a very strong field of entries. Nathan’s stood out as brave articles that reflected his maturity and life skills. They were original stories that utilised his network of contacts and not only had relevance to his local community but also had wider social implications as shown by the fact they were taken up by state and national media. He asked tough questions of people in power and the stories reflect a good range of sometimes hard-to-get interviews. They are a very strong start for a new journalist.”

Links to view winning submission (one, two and three).

Best News Photograph

Sponsored by The Sunday Times

Winner:
• Marta Pascual Juanola, Falcon Beach Fatal Shark Attack, Mandurah Mail

Finalists:
• Colin Murty, Yarloop Devastation, Perth Now and The Australian
• Michael O’Brien, Freeway Inferno, The West Australian

Judges’ comments:
“It was a year of powerful flame images from the flames of Yarloop to burning trucks on Mitchell Freeway. But the winner this year went to a drama on a beach new Mandurah that might have lost to smartphone shots if Marta had not reacted as good news photographers do when code 262 – shark attack – came down the police feed. In shots that would have looked like staged movie stills if we did not know this story was so tragically real. We saw all the human and emergency services drama in trying to save a life. Marta’s work was live, on the spot news photography at its best.”

Links to view winning submission (one, two and three).

Best News Photograph- Community/Regional

Sponsored by Media Super

Winner:
• Jon Gellweiler, Body of Work, Ampersand Southwest Magazine

Finalists:
• Jon Hewson Body of Work, Mandurah Coastal Times
• Andrew Ritchie, Body of Work, Guardian Express

Judges’ comments:

“Jon Gelweiller showed great skills with a diverse range of topics. The pictures were distinctly Bunbury and the South West but the imagery transcended the locality. Jon was under clear pressure to produce when he called his reporter away from the pub to play torch-waver for the stunning shot of a basketball import who had become a local identity. He showed what can be done with water, sunlight and the Bunbury skyline when he turned what could have been a pedestrian paddler pic into a sports classic. Jon says he seeks to find a different angle and he certainly succeeded with his winning shots.”

Links to view winning submission (one, two and three).

Best Feature Photographic Essay

Sponsored by Media Super

Winner:
• Colin Murty, Eradication of pests on Dirk Hartog Island, The Australian

Finalists:
• Philip Gostelow,The Utopia Project, The Weekend Australian Magazine
• Martine Perret, Ngala Wongga, ABC Goldfields Radio

Judges’ comments:
“The judges were all taken in by Colin Murty’s photographs of Sue Robinson and Bax working on the eradication program on Dirk Hartog. Colin set out to convey the desolation, space and beauty. And he did this with stunning use of landscape, light and spacing of his human and canine talent. The images speak for themselves.”

Links to view winning submission (one, two, three and four).

Best Broadcast Camerawork

Sponsored by Media Entertainment & Arts Alliance

Winner:
• Cameron Wallis, Devil Inside – Power of Meth, Seven News 6pm

Finalists:
• James Hayward, Waroona – Yarloop Fires, Nine News Perth, Today Sydney, Nine Network
• Simon Hydzik, Body of Work, Seven News Perth

Judges’ comments:
“Cam Wallis’s video expose of addicts’ battles with methamphetamine is an outstanding example of precision storytelling, from panoramic drone vision to concise closeups that clearly mark each chapter. His focus on the simple power of people’s faces is both confronting and compelling. Cam’s use of light and shade, haunting family images and a stunning piece to camera in Part Three cap off the masterclass.”

Links to view winning submission one.

Regional and Community – Best Three News Stories or Features

Sponsored by Media Entertainment & Arts Alliance

Winner:
• Nathan Morris, Preservation of Aboriginal languages of the Goldfields, Esperance, ABC Local Radio, ABC News Online, ABC News 24

Finalists:
• Jasmine Bamford, Kalgoorlie multimedia Entry , ABC Goldfields-Esperance Breakfast program
• Andrew Brosnan, Body of Work. Kalgoorlie Miner

Judges’ comments:
“Finalists’ entries were all of a high standard. Several others were commendable. Nathan Morris’s pieces were wonderfully vivid. True to their particular people and places, imaginatively shot, beautifully edited, they were also fruit of time well spent before the camera “rolled”. Their subjects were obviously at ease, allowed to tell their own stories, effectively assisted to do so. No word or image was wasted. “Academic” and “grass roots” speakers were interwoven uncommonly well. Serious issues were explored, but no story became tediously “worthy”, and the first was great fun. Subtitles were used well, sparingly. Nathan himself made no unnecessary intrusions, but any attentive viewer knows he worked hard and well. His first story’s text-based version was fine in its own right, illustrated by Nathan’s photos. If there were separate categories for “feature” and “investigative”, Andrew Brosnan would have been a worthy winner of the latter.”

Links to view winning submission (one, two and three).

Suburban – Best Three Stories or Feature

Sponsored by WA Public Transport Authority
Winner:
• Sarah Brookes, Body of Work, Echo Newspaper

Finalists:
• David Cohen and Bret Christian, Gang crashes dinner party, POST Newspapers
• Bryce Luff, Terror on our Roads, Cockburn Gazette

Judges’ comments:
“This work is revelatory, well-written and highly relevant to its audience. Brookes showed that in the Perth hills, the NBN was not about cables but towers, lots of them, and she understood the storytelling power of an excellent graphic. Brookes’ story on the damage caused to the environment by feral pigs was thoroughly researched. Her report on the new Midland hospital shed new light on what services would not be offered, and the health implications of this for individuals.”

Links to view winning submission (one, two and three).

Best Freelance Journalist

Sponsored by Media, Entertainment & Arts Alliance

Winner:
• Kerry Faulkner, Special report WA’s accident towing industry among worst in Australia

Judges’ comments:
“Kerry Faulkner’s entry exposed unsavoury practices in Western Australia’s accident towing industry, describing it as “one of the worst in Australia”. Kerry obtained access to a confidential insurance industry internal report showing serious price gouging, a tow truck driver boarding an ambulance to pressure a woman who was being treated for her signature, aggressive behavior by ‘towies’ towards police and paramedics at accident scenes, creating accident scene traffic hazards, and misleading stressed car owners into thinking the towies are contracted for the job. The article pointed out that some towies were operating “well outside acceptable business practices” and highlighted the need for legislation to govern the industry to protect consumers. The article was well researched and key stakeholders comments were presented.”

Links to view winning submission one.

Best Culture and Arts Report

Sponsored by Bird in Hand

Winner:
• Victoria Laurie, Through the Lens; Mavis Walley, The Weekend Australian

Finalists:
• LaurenDay, The art of prosthetic eye painting, ABC 7.30
• Erin Parke, Miss Daisy, 7.30 ABC TV

Judges’ comments:
“Victoria Laurie has again entrenched her reputation as the leading culture and arts reporter in the state. Her remarkable stories about the chance discovery of photographs by Mavis Walley – a proud, illiterate mother of 11 who used her beloved box brownie camera to capture a rarely seen part of Western Australian history – are more fine examples of Laurie’s exceptional reporting and writing skills. Laurie’s stories brought to life the images captured by Walley in the small Wheatbelt town of Goomalling during the mid-20th century, capturing the pride, joy and resilience of Walley’s fellow Aboriginal people in a defiant rebuttal to those who presume these lives were pure hardship. Laurie conveyed not only the artistic beauty of the compositions, but also the historical and cultural significance of the photographs and the impact of their re-emergence on the descendants of the men and women in the images.”

Links to view winning submission (one and two).

Best Health/Medical Report

Sponsored by The Gordon Reid Family Foundation

Winner:
• Emma Young, A child’s ‘best interests’, WAtoday

Finalists:
• Cathy O’Leary, Robbie’s Fight, The Weekend West
• Rebecca Turner, Politics before public health? The children’s water park at Elizabeth Quay, ABC News Perth

Judges’ comments:
“A very strong category again this year but Emma Young’s piece was not only the best but one of biggest stories of the year. She used modern digital reporting at its best to accompany sensitive and well balanced written pieces. Her research and tenacity developed a series of stories that probed the broader issues at play and provoked debate on a sensitive topic. A heartbreaking story which raised both moral and ethical queries in the medical and wider community. Cathy O’Leary’s report also bought an important issue to light and was highly recommended.”

Links to view winning submission (one, two and three).

Best Science and Environmental Report

Sponsored by Media, Entertainment & Arts Alliance

Winner:
• Emma Young, Lancelin residents win development battle, get dunes rezoned for conservation, WAtoday

Finalists:
• Liam Croy, Cockburn Sound fish kill, The West Australian
• Ben O’Shea, Gravity Waves Discovery, The Weekend West

Judges’ comments:
“A good news story requires well researched and balanced reporting without bias. It must also pique public interest while finally getting a result, either negative or positive, for the protagonists. Emma Young’s series met all these criteria. A series of bungles by the State, environmental bodies and a shire eventually forced the Government to knock back a rezoning plan to protect an endangered plant species protected by Federal law. This report highlighted lackadaisical and inadequate investigation, research and planning by a number of statuary bodies resulting in a different outcome for both the local and wider communities.”

Links to view winning submission (one, two and three).

Best Social Equity Report

Sponsored by Media, Entertainment & Arts Alliance

Winner:
• Paige Taylor and Victoria Laurie, The reality of everyday life for our most vulnerable kids, The Weekend Australian

Finalists:
• Courtney Bembridge, Indigenous language barriers putting innocent people behind bars, ABC News – Online
• Victoria Laurie and Paige Taylor, Gene Gibson, The Weekend Australian

Judges comments:
“The entries in this category were very strong overall, however the stories by Paige Taylor and Victoria Laurie stood out in a class of their own. The reality of everyday life for our most vulnerable kids is described through two incidents that prompted widespread outrage – an 11 year old boy charged with murder, and a 10 year old girl who took her own life. The issues these articles explore are uncomfortable and complex. Yet by detailed research, good contacts and trusted relationships with communities and services, Taylor and Laurie are able to take us inside a world that most Australians would not willingly enter. These stories humanize the headlines of alleged murder and suicide by children and open up confronting national conversations about how as a society we care for our most vulnerable children and families. They do this with a sensitivity that does not disenfranchise the people that have trusted them to tell these confronting stories.”

Links to view winning submission (one, two and three).

Business, Economics or Finance Report

Sponsored by Media, Entertainment & Arts Alliance

Winner:
• Courtney Bembridge, Subcontractors lose millions on airport build, ABC News – Online

Finalists:
• Nick Evans, Sparkle goes from Kimberley Diamonds, The West Australian
• Nick Sas, Mobile phone billing scam hits Telstra clients, The West Australian

Judges’ comments:
“First-class reporting on a complex issue that covered personal, legal, and policy issues. Viewers shook their heads over a terrible blowout that affected a dozen small contractors. These people were shoddily treated and were given a much-needed voice thanks to Courtney and the ABC. She uncovered a widespread problem, and the state government recently announced a way to address the issue.”

Commended:
“Mobile phone bill scam, by Nick Sas, The West Australian. Scam, scandal, outrage: whatever you call it, it affected Telstra customers nationwide. Nick’s reports contained a strong human element.
Well done on keeping the bastards honest, and persuading someone who was affected to go on the record. This two-part piece has directly benefited consumers, and is what good journalism should be about – and it was also incisively written.”

Commended:
“Sparkle goes from Kimberley Diamonds, by Nick Evans, The West Australian. More excellent work from Nick Evans. The Mining Rehabilitation Scheme – what a cock up by the state government. Workers entitlements left high and dry – $5million of staff money lost, and sub-contractors go broke, while the parent company walks away. We deserve more from authorities than this, and we are lucky to have business reporters of the calibre of Nick to keep watch on the corporate world.”

Links to view winning submission (one, two and three)

Best Political Report

Sponsored by The Sunday Times

Winners:
• Andrew Probyn, Mediscare, The West Australian
• Rebecca Turner and Jessica Strutt, The big money and politics behind the Kwinana buffer protests, ABC News Perth

Finalists:
• Anthony De Ceglie, Aboard Gravy Train, The Sunday Times/PerthNow
• Joe Spagnolo, Stephen Smith: From Beginning to End, The Sunday Times

Judges’ comments:
“Mediscare, by Andrew Probyn, The West Australian. All the ingredients of a winner, and a very important national scoop that dominated the political agenda for months. Andrew Probyn broke the story in February. All parties should have known it would be an election issue as the back office work employs thousands of Community Public Sector Union workers. Probyn’s analysis clearly spelt out Turnbull’s dilemma. But Turnbull didn’t act until June 19, a fornight until election day, giving Labor the Mediscare weapon. With the GP payments freeze and pathology cuts, one more seat and Mediscare could have won the election. Excellent get and insight into Australian thinking by Probyn.”

“Kwinana buffer zone, by Rebecca Turner and Jessica Strutt, ABC News. Excellent combination of reportage of a protest by ordinary land owners, and pulling back the veil of corporate donations and influence.
The small landholders have had their retirement plans shattered while big end of town property investors are in conflict with government policy. Satterley retaliates by withholding funds from Liberal HQ – looks like HBO drama but it’s real life. Followers of these reports wondered:‘Who is the state government serving?’ Jess Strutt asking the hard questions and pressing for answers on a disturbing and murky topic.”

Commended:
“Smith tilt, by Joe Spagnolo, The Sunday Times. Joe was always first with this story while other media ignored the months-long rumblings of the Labor backbench, or didn’t have attribution. Good contacts and perseverance paid off with the exclusive Smith interview. Spagnolo deserves credit for sticking with his instincts and pursuing Smith to speak.”

Commended:
“All Aboard Gravy Train, by Anthony De Ceglie, The Sunday Times. Excellent work: holding politicians to account. This rail travel was a rort that failed the pub test – and the users should have known it did not meet community expectations, especially when ministers such as Helen Morton were cutting programs to the needy in her department. Without scrutiny from The Sunday Times it would still be there for any pollie’s winter break.”

Links to view winning submissions by Andrew Probyn (one, two and three).

Links to view winning submissions by Rebecca Turner and Jessica Strutt (one, two and three).

Online

Sponsored by Media, Entertainment & Arts Alliance

Winner:
• Yarloop and Waroona Fire Coverage Team Entry, Simon White, Emma Young , Tim Carrier, Heather McNeil and David Baker, WAtoday.com.au and Fairfax Media national network

Finalists:
• Ryan Emery, Life on Christmas Island, sbs.com.au/news
• The Hidden High Team Entry. Simon White, Franziska Rimrod, Giovanni Torre, Mary Louise Brammer and James Mooney, The hidden high: flying high under the radar on synthetic meth, WAtoday.com.au

Judges’ comments:
“The team made innovative use of the digital platform to provide extensive coverage that offered an important community service in a time of crisis and confusion. The well-curated collection of elements included good use of audio, a great collection of pictures and a compelling live blog and trunk story that was updated more than 80 times. The inclusion of stories, not only about the devastation but of innovative ways that members of the broader WA community were seeking to support the victims extended the relevance of the coverage to a wider audience. In doing so, it is likely to have facilitated the provision of aid and support.”

Links to view winning submission (one, two and three).

Best Three Headlines

Sponsored by Walkley Foundation

Winner:
• Martin Saxon, “To Boo or Not Taboo”, “A Day of Whine and Roses” and “Its Fancy Of The Overflow”, The Sunday Times STM magazine

Finalist:
• David Cusworth, “Tale dogs the WAG”, “Ham minimisation a barbecue stopper” and “Dry planes snifter calls Qantas home”, The Sunday Times

Judges comments:
“Martin Saxon’s headlines do everything they should and more. Attention grabbing, true to the stories they represent and just the right amount of clever, Martin’s headlines demand attention. Working within the available space and using it to maximum effect, Martin’s eye-catching offerings jump off the page to engage and entice. The topical and witty ‘To boo or not taboo’ demands further reading, sets the tone for the yarn, and finds the appropriate balance between pithy and powerful. ‘It’s Fancy of the Overflow’ and ‘A Day of Whine and Roses’ both deliver a wealth of intriguing connotations in an admirable scarcity of words. A headline writer demonstrably at the top of the game, Martin’s work makes the top of the page a compelling and entertaining entreaty to read on. No word or opportunity is wasted in these offerings that show a fine example of the craft.”

Links to view winning submission (one, two and three).

Best Sports Report

Sponsored by Lion

Winner:
• John Townsend, Eagles dodge drugs bullet, The West Australian

Finalists:
• Courtney Bembridge, Safety concerns at WA racetrack, ABC News – Online
• Nick Rynne, WAFL star’s family heartbreak, The Weekend West

Judges’ comments:
“John Townsend used traditional reporting skills to break his story about the West Coast Eagles’ inadvertent use of banned substances. The story, which was revealed at a public forum at which Townsend was the only reporter because of his inside knowledge of the matters to be discussed, had national significance and set the agenda for Perth’s sporting media at a time when the Essendon drugs furore was still at the forefront of the public’s consciousness. His in-depth reporting revealed how the Eagles had avoided a repeat of the Bombers scandal and was a fine example of a legitimate sports reporting scoop.”

Links to view winning submission (one and two).

Best Columnist – The Matt Price Award

Sponsored by The West Australian

Winner:
• Liam Bartlett, Weekly Columns, The Sunday Times

Finalists:
• Andrew Probyn, Probyn Columns, The West Australian
• Shane Wright, The Innovation Battle, The West Australian

Judges’ comments:
“Liam Bartlett is the consummate columnist, with the ability to hone in relentlessly on his subject, then broaden the parameters of the argument in a way that serves to skewer his subject all the more.
Such is the effect of his piece on Lord Mayoral perks. His column on GST distribution takes a now familiar West Australian saw and reframes it around gambling revenue enjoyed by other states. Liam’s firm point of view on swimming ‘hero’ Grant Hackett was vindicated with events that transpired the day the piece went to print. With a neat, often amusing turn of phrase (“The state capital now has a Lord Mayor who thinks ethics is an English county”) and sound research skills, these columns are a must for readers of The Sunday Times and often set the WA media agenda for the week ahead.”

Links to view winning submission (one, two and three)

Radio/Audio Journalism – Best News Story or Feature

Sponsored by Edith Cowan University

Winner:
• Lauren Day, Man facing deportation despite living in WA since infancy, ABC PM

Finalists:
• Joseph Dunstan, Carnarvon Aboriginal Flag Debate, ABC Radio North West WA
• Ryan Emery, Giving voice to regional migrants, SBS World News

Judges’ comments:
“Lauren Day uncovered the story of Ian Wightman, a 51 year old man who was awaiting deportation from Christmas Island as a non-citizen, despite only ever knowing life in Australia. Her feature skilfully and clearly demonstrated the results of controversial changes to the Migration Act, which have led to the detention, and deportation, of people who have identified as Australian their whole lives. It played to the strengths of radio as a medium, telling a story from inside the Christmas Island Detention Centre, by phone.”

Commended:
Joseph Dunstan’s Carnarvon Aboriginal Flag Debate – “Judges agreed that the story had a clear public interest in giving voice to one of the hundreds of people who identified as Australian but were caught up in this sweeping change to Australia’s immigration system. The piece was well-researched, balanced and engaging from start to finish.”

Links to view winning submission (one).

Television/Audio-Visual Journalism – Best News Story or Feature

Sponsored by Media Super

Winner:
• Jessica Page, Parents Versus Doctors, Seven News 6pm

Finalists:
• Liam Bartlett, Who Killed Josh Warneke?, Nine News Western Australia
• Lauren Day, A look behind the St John Ambulance suicides, ABC 7.30

Judges’ comments:
“Jessica Page’s exclusive report sparked discussion across the country. Jessica’s determination saw her successfully apply for leave to report Family Court proceedings, usually restricted to media. The court granted a publication order at 5pm, giving Jessica an hour to get it to air. The public interest in the legal battle between doctors and parents saw the story receive nation attention across all networks. Her report on 4th July would be the first in an ongoing battle, with the Kiszkos ultimately winning the right to stop chemo and radiation therapy for their terminally ill son.”

Links to view winning submission (one, two and three).

Best Print/Text Feature Writing

Sponsored by Lavan Legal

Winner:
• Andrew Burrell, The Utopia Project, The Weekend Australian Magazine

Finalists:
• Annabel Hennessy, Ripped Tide: Body Builders Investigation, The Sunday Times
• Victoria Laurie, Trail Blazer, The Weekend Australian Magazine

Judges’ comments:
“Andrew Burrell’s fascinating feature took us inside the mysterious Ideal Human Environment experiment on the outskirts of Kununurra in WA’s remote Kimberley. Is it a cult? Is it a breakthrough in human happiness? Burrell broke new ground by going inside this highly unorthodox social experiment and pulling back the curtain on an untold, unusual but very human story right in our backyard. Burrell’s first person observations were buttressed by rigorous reporting, particularly James Salerno’s groups run-ins with the taxman. In all, it was a first class feature that intrigued, surprised and provoked.”

Links to view winning submission (one).

Best Print/Text News Report

Sponsored by The West Australian

Winner:
• Andrew Probyn, Medicare Privatisation, The West Australian

Finalists:
• Bret Christian, Series subject: Killer revelations, Post Newspapers, Perth
• Joe Spagnolo, Freight Link, The Sunday Times

Judges’ comments:
“Andrew Probyn’s articles that came to be known as ‘Mediscare’ concerned a secret and highly risky Federal Government plan to privatise Medicare. If successful, the private sector would deliver Medicare, pharmaceutical and aged-care benefits under an extraordinary health services transformation affecting every Australian. Only a few bureaucrats knew of the plan and it was to be a key feature of the Treasurer’s first Budget in May. It would involve a $50 billion-plus outsourcing and it would be the first time the private sector would deliver a government-subsidised national service. As Probyn wrote: “Reforms don’t get much bigger – or more politically dangerous than this.” The story dominated parliamentary debate in the first fortnight of sittings, attracted Senate hearings and haunted the Government during the election campaign, forcing the plan’s abandonment a fortnight before polling day. Probyn’s stories were incisive, his analysis accurate, and they impacted heavily on the election campaign.”

Links to view winning submission (one, two and three).

The Arthur Lovekin Award

Presented by the University of Western Australia

Winner:

• David Cohen – The Post

Judges’ comments:

The Post is well-known for good investigative journalism at a local level. The Panel felt that this series of articles addressing changes to Strata law was an excellent example of a story of key topical interest that might otherwise have gone largely unreported. David Cohen’s articles highlighted the consequences of proposed legislation that will alter the balance of power between developers and individual property owners. The author was able to report the story in the broader context of the erosion of individual rights, and he showed tenacity in following the story. He used an array of sources to expand the original story in a cogent manner. Although the scope of local paper reporting obviously differs from that afforded by national publications in terms of reach, the Panel felt that this kind of journalism is nonetheless valuable and impactful particularly in the community at which this article was targeted.”

Outstanding Contribution to Journalism-The Clarion Award 2016

Sponsored by Media, Entertainment & Arts Alliance

Winner:
• Nick Evans, The West Australian

West Australian Journalist of the Year – Daily News Centenary Prize 2016

Sponsored by Curtin University

Winner: Andrew Probyn – The West Australian

Judges comments:

“Andrew Probyn for his series of stories about the federal government’s plans to privatise the Medicare payments system. Probyn’s stories were a stand out in a competitive field – detailed, clearly written and providing astute analysis, they had a major impact on federal politics. Probyn wrote: “Reforms don’t get much bigger, or more politically dangerous, than this …..Turnbull will have to decide whether a massive privatisation of national health payments is worth the political pain. Does he roll the dice or will this be another bright idea left for another time? The ‘Mediscare’ story, as it became known, dominated much of the debate throughout the election campaign with the issue dogging the federal government and Malcolm Turnbull abandoning the plan two weeks out from the poll.”

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Anna Magnus, National Manager, State Media Awards

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